Notarial Services

The Consulate provides notarial services to American Citizens and legal permanent residents (Green Card holders) of the United States. We are also happy to notarize documents that will be used in the United States for citizens of other countries.

For us to notarize your documents, you must:

  • Make an appointment. All services are provided by appointment only. Appointments are made online. Make Appointment!
  • Please bring with you government-issued photo ID. A passport or Hong Kong ID card is best;
  • You must have filled-in the document with the appropriate names, places and dates (but don’t sign it; you’ll sign it at the Consulate in front of the Consular Officer);
  • You will pay a fee at the Consulate of U.S. $50.00 or HK $400 per notarial signature/stamp.

    Payment options are as follows:

    • U.S. or local currency;
    • Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express or Diners Club. All credit card transactions are in U.S. dollars, as if the transaction occurred in the United States.

A Power of Attorney allows you to empower someone to act in your place, for example, to take some action on real estate in the U.S. on your behalf while you are in Hong Kong.

The preparation of legal forms is typically the task of an attorney. Examples of legal forms are available on-line (PDF 8.54 KB), but please keep in mind that the forms and their purposes can vary widely from one jurisdiction to another. We cannot advise you on the specific language needed in your Power of Attorney; please consult a lawyer or other advisor for assistance before coming to see us to notarize the document.

An Affidavit is a sworn statement made by an individual. Please write out the statement you wish to attest or swear to, but do not sign the form until instructed to do so by the Consular Officer.

The preparation of legal forms is typically the task of an attorney. Examples of legal forms are available on-line (PDF 9.22 KB), but please keep in mind that the forms and their purposes can vary widely from one jurisdiction to another. We cannot advise you on the specific language needed in your Power of Attorney; please consult a lawyer or other advisor for assistance before coming to see us to notarize the document.

Unfortunately we cannot perform a Medallion Signature Guarantee, which is a special type of signature acknowledgement sometimes required for the exchange of securities. The Consulate does not have a list of Medallion Program member institutions. Please contact your financial institution for guidance on this matter.

A Medallion Signature Guarantee can only be obtained from a participant in one of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) approved programs, such as a commercial bank, brokerage firm, credit union or savings and loans institutions that are members of the Medallion Stamp Program. For more information on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Medallion Program, please visit “Signature Guarantees: Preventing the Unauthorized Transfer of Securities” web page.

For documents to be used in Hong Kong or Macau, you may also choose to consult a local notary public, many of whom keep hours or are at locations that may be convenient for you. A list of attorneys in Hong Kong who provide notarial services is available at “Legal Assistance (Notary Matters)” web page.

Please note that the Consulate cannot assume responsibility for the professional ability or integrity of the firms or persons whose names appear on the lists. They are arranged alphabetically; the order in which they appear has no other significance.

Please note that the Consulate cannot authenticate or provide copies of documents such as birth, marriage, divorce or death certificates, U.S. driver’s licenses, academic transcripts, diplomas or the like.

Authentication or legalization is the procedure by which the authority of persons who issue or execute documents in one country may be recognized by another country. It is possible to have documents notarized by a local notary public for use in the United States if the notary public’s signature is authenticated. The United States, Hong Kong, and Macau are parties to the Hague Convention which abolishes the requirement of diplomatic and consular legalization for public documents originating in one Convention member and intended for use in another. Because of the Convention, consular officers are prohibited from authenticating documents in Hong Kong or Macau for use in the United States.

For information on authenticating U.S. documents for use in either Hong Kong or Macau, please contact the State Department’s Office of Authentication. That website also maintains information on other members to this Hague Convention and their designated Central Authorities.

For information on authenticating documents in Macau for use in the United States, please contact the Chief Executive of the Secretary for Administration and Justice or the Director of Justice Affairs, Department of the Macau Special Administrative Region.

For details on procedures to authenticate Hong Kong documents, please contact the Registrar’s Office, Room LG115, High Court Building, 38 Queensway, Hong Kong’ Website: Hong Kong Judiciary

Tel.: (852) 2825-4226

 

Last modified: January 3, 2017